ACM Washington Update, Vol. 9.3 (March 31, 2005)

CONTENTS [1] U.S. Supreme Court Hears Arguments in MGM v. Grokster [2] USACM Calls for Stronger Cybersecurity in Power Plants [3] Experts Begin Voter-Registration Database Study [4] Momentum Turns Toward Privacy Protection [5] Legislation on the Move [6] Innovation Finds Another Champion [7] Events to Watch In April [8] About USACM [An archive of all […]

NYT editorial: When David Steals Goliath’s Music

“The battle over online music piracy is usually presented as David versus Goliath: the poor student in his dorm hunted down by a music conglomerate. It is easy, in that matchup, to side with the student. But when the Supreme Court takes up the issue this week, we hope it considers another party to the […]

NYT editorial: When David Steals Goliath's Music

“The battle over online music piracy is usually presented as David versus Goliath: the poor student in his dorm hunted down by a music conglomerate. It is easy, in that matchup, to side with the student. But when the Supreme Court takes up the issue this week, we hope it considers another party to the […]

Grokster and StreamCast face the music

“The entertainment industry is taking its battle against illegal downloading to America’s Supreme Court. But attacking the technology behind file-sharing could stifle innovation without tackling the industry’s long-term problems […] THE music business should have stuck by Thomas Edison’s technology if it wanted to avoid the threat of piracy. His wax cylinders could record a […]

Is Intellectual Property Really The Same As Real Property?

Originally Posted: (3/17/05) — Understanding the fundamentals underlying a debate often provides useful insight into policymakers’ thinking about an issue. Over the past two days, two different events highlighted a fundamental part of the MGM vs. Grokster debate. On Tuesday, the conservative Heritage Foundation held an event titled “Government’s Role In Protecting Constitutional Rights in […]

Wash Post editorial: Up for the Count

“MARYLAND VOTERS will never know for sure whether their election choices last year were recorded correctly — and the same uncertainty could haunt them next year if lawmakers again fail to address a serious defect in the touch-screen voting machines used throughout the state. When functioning properly — and the state elections administrator, Linda H. […]