Global Technology Policy Newsletter – March 2017

By Renee Dopplick, ACM Director of Public Policy
March 12, 2017

ACM PUBLIC POLICY HIGHLIGHTS

ACM provides independent, nonpartisan, and technology-neutral research and resources to policy leaders, stakeholders, and the public about public policy issues, as drawn from the deep technical expertise of the computing community.

Apply for the new ACM Future of Computing Academy – Early career computing professionals are invited to apply for the inaugural ACM Future of Computing Academy. The Academy is a platform that enables the next generation of researchers, practitioners, educators and entrepreneurs to develop a coherent and influential voice that addresses challenging issues facing the field and society in general. Applications are due by March 15, 2017.

ACM at SXSW – Join ACM at SXSW for a session on artificial intelligence on Saturday morning with Eric Horvitz and a session on interactive data analysis and visualizations on Monday morning with Jeff Heer.

Internet of Things – The ACM U.S. Public Policy Council will provide additional input and recommendations in response the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Green Paper: Fostering the Advancement of the Internet of Things. The Green Paper references and cites input provided by the ACM U.S. Public Policy Council, particularly as related to IoT privacy and security. Comments are due March 13, 2017.

Data Sciences Education – ACM is sponsoring a new 3-year initiative on data sciences postsecondary education organized by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. A series of roundtable meetings will bring together data scientists, educators, industry, and government to discuss ways to strengthen the data sciences education, research, and workforce pipelines. The next roundtable meeting will be on March 20, 2017.

ICYMI – Free Webinars

Free Webinar on Artificial Intelligence and Ethics – ACM Learning Center’s Town Hall: Big Thoughts and Big Questions about Ethics in Artificial Intelligence with Professor Joanna J. Bryson, Professor Francesca Rossi, ACM Fellow Stuart Russell, ACM Fellow Michael Wooldridge, ACM SIGAI Ethics Officer Nicholas Mattei and ACM SIGAI Secretary/Treasurer Rosemary Paradis. Watch the archived webcast on YouTube.

Free Webinar on Undergraduate Data Science Education – Did you miss last month’s popular webinar on “UC Berkeley’s Data Science Course for Undergraduates: Computational and Inferential Thinking for the 21st Century,” co-sponsored by ACM and the American Statistical Association? Watch the archived webcast on YouTube.

Upcoming ACM Public Policy Meetings

• The ACM Europe Policy Committee will meet in Munich, Germany on March 2, 2017.

• The ACM U.S. Public Policy Council governance body will hold its next meeting in Washington, D.C. on March 30-31, 2017.

• The ACM Education Policy Committee will hold working group calls on computer science education.

EUROPE HIGHLIGHTS

Draft ePrivacy Regulation – A proposed Regulation on Privacy and Electronic Communications aims to address privacy, trust, and security in the Digital Single Market and to update and align current rules with the General Data Protection Regulation, which will become effective next year.

Building the European Data Economy – The European Commission unveiled newly proposed policy and legal solutions to address the EU’s data economy and to realize effective implementation of the Digital Single Market strategy. The “Building the European Data Economy” package includes a Communication and a Staff Working Document. The Commission seeks further input on data access and transfers, liability related to data-based products and services, and data portability, reuse, and ownership.

Computing and Informatics Education – Nearly one million people participated in the annual EU Code Week held in October 2016. The majority of students at more than one-third of participating schools learned the basics of coding and computational thinking. The European Commission and the organizers of the EU Code Week are hoping for another record-setting year in 2017. Save the date for EU Code Week 7-22 October 2017.

Europe – Opportunities for Public Input

Future Role of the EU Cybersecurity Agency – ENISA
EU Agency for Network and Information Security
European Commission
Deadline: 12 April 2017

Building a European Data Economy
Results will inform a possible future initiative on the European Data Economy in 2017.
European Commission
Deadline: 26 April 2017

UNITED STATES HIGHLIGHTS

Nominate Computer Science Teachers for Presidential Award – Nominations are being accepted for the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching (PAEMST). This includes computer science teachers working in grades 7-12. The deadline is April 1, 2017.

Cryptography – The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine released a workshop summary report on Cryptographic Agility and Interoperability. The report covers standards, technical infrastructure, security implications, user implications, potential areas of research, and policy implications.

Artificial Intelligence and Blockchain – The Federal Trade Commission will hold a Forum on Artificial Intelligence and Blockchain on March 9, 2017 at U.C. Berkeley, California. Attend in person or watch the live webcast for free.

United States – Opportunities for Public Input

Digital Identity Guidelines
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
Deadline: March 31, 2017

Updates to the NIST Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity (NIST Cybersecurity Framework)
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
Deadline: April 10, 2017


Have events to add? Please let us know at: acmpo@acm.org


ACM Europe Policy Committee

The ACM Europe Policy Committee is a standing committee of ACM Europe. It serves as the focal point for ACM’s interaction with the EU and member states’ governmental bodies, the computing community, and the public in matters of European public policy related to computing and technology. The committee represents a diverse community of computing practitioners, scientists, educators, researchers, and other technology professionals from government, business, academia, and the nonprofit sector. The committee’s contributions to public policy draws from the deep scientific and technical expertise of the computing community.

ACM U.S. Public Policy Council

The ACM U.S. Public Policy Council is chartered as the focal point for ACM’s interaction with the U.S. government, the computing community, and the public in all matters of U.S. public policy related to computing and technology. USACM represents a diverse community of computing practitioners, scientists, educators, researchers, and other technology professionals from government, business, academia, and the nonprofit sector. Its contributions to public policy draws from the deep scientific and technical expertise of the computing community.

ACM Education Policy Committee

The ACM Education Policy Committee is a high-level committee of acclaimed computer scientists and educators dedicated to improving opportunities for quality education in computer science and computing-related fields. The Education Policy Committee develops initiatives aimed at shaping education policies that impact the computing field. A primary goal of the EPC is to ensure that computer science, computing, and informatics education is recognized in educational initiatives at all levels of the educational pipeline.